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We MIGHT see the aurora from the UK tonight…maybe…perhaps…possibly…

There’s a chance – just a chance – that people in the UK might, MIGHT see the “Northern lights” in the sky tonight. Lots of people and websites are making very dramatic predictions, raising expectations, really hyping this up, but that’s stupid. We might see nothing at all! I’ve been writing about this over on Facebook, and so I don’t have to write it all out again I’m just going to copy in my posts here. So, no predictions, and absolutely no guarantees… but do keep an eye on the sky tonight after dark. Just in case. 🙂


 

  • SATURDAY POST

Lots of Facebook pages and websites are screaming out that there is going to be a huge display of the northern lights on Sunday night. Is there?

Well now, not wanting to build anyone’s hopes up unrealistically, and absolutely, definitely NOT saying something WILL happen (please read that last bit back again, it’s important!) but yes, there’s a reasonable chance that people in parts of the UK *might* be able to see the northern lights on Sunday night. There has been a big eruption on the Sun which has hurled a huge amount of solar material right at us, and if everything goes well – and there are no guarantees that it will! – then the aurora borealis *might* be given a big enough kick on Sunday night and into Monday morning to bring it far enough south to make auroral activity visible from the UK.

It’s important to be honest and realistic about this though. Apart from the basic fact that we’re not sure anything will happen, it’s the middle of summer, so the sky will not get truly dark, meaning any aurora that is triggered will be somewhat subdued compared to how it would look in a really dark sky. So, with that in mind what should you be doing?

Well, first of all be prepared to see absolutely nothing and don’t get your hopes up too much. Like comets and NLC, the aurora likes nothing better than to promise us a good display then do nothing. The best thing you can do is be somewhere which will offer you a good view *if* something happens. And that place will be somewhere away from streetlights, with a clear view to the north, with no mountains, hills or tall buildings in the way. If you can jump into a car and get out into the countryside and find such a place, perfect. If you can’t, just do your best. If you’re stuck at home still take a look from your garden. You might be lucky!

Be in place after dark on Sunday night – then all you can do is wait and see what happens. But again, it’s important to have realistic expectations. When shown on TV and in films the northern lights are usually a) speeded up and b) enhanced to make them appear brighter and more colourful than they actually appear to the naked eye. Magazines, books and websites love using photos showing a sky full of vivid green curtains, tall cherry-red search-beams and golden arcs whenever they need to illustrate a story about the aurora, and a major auroral storm can look like that – but most don’t. During most displays you might, if you’re lucky, see reds and greens but much more subdued than those photos – which are also usually long exposures taken with very sophisticated cameras and then processed to enhance them – show.

So on Sunday night if you can get to a good observing location be on the look out for pale green, almost grey beams, curtains and arcs in the northern sky, with maybe a hint of pink here and there. If a big display kicks off the colours might get brighter and more obvious, just cross your fingers. As for movement, yes, there could be movement, and in a a major display you can see why the aurora is also known as “The Merrie Dancers” in Scotland, because they can leap and sway and swish about. But more likely you’ll just see features slowly fading in and out of view, brightening and fading away again, and might see activity rippling from side to side as you watch. Of course, if a major display does kick off then the sky could go nuts, then all you can do is stare up at it in wonder and enjoy it. But, again, without wanting to sound like a stuck cd, please be aware that this is not guaranteed for Sunday night, if anything happens at all.

If you want to take photographs, just have a go with whatever camera you’ve got, it can’t hurt! But best to try with a digital SLR camera on a sturdy tripod, using a wide angle lens, time exposures of several seconds and ISO settings of 400 or 800 or so. Expose for too long or with too high an ISO setting and all you’ll get is a greenish smear. Expose for too short a time and with too low an ISO setting and you’ll probably not pick anything up at all. Just experiment, try different settings until you get something that works – but don’t waste time faffing about with a camera if a display happens, leave it alone and just watch the show! (By the way, even if you can’t see anything visually, try taking a few photos anyway – your camera might pick up something too faint for your eyes to see…)

So, bottom line… this is just a heads up that people in parts of the UK *might* be able to see the northern lights on Sunday night, but there are no guarantees. But if you don’t look it’s guaranteed you’ll see nothing! You should be thinking about being somewhere with a clear unobstructed view to the north after dark on Sunday night, but prepared to see absolutely nothing. Prospects might improve or worsen as today and tomorrow pass, so keep monitoring Facebook’s aurora-watching groups (we’ll try to post updates on here tomorrow evening but can’t guarantee it!) and, if you’re a Twitter user, there are lots of aurora-hunters on Twitter you can follow for updates too. And if you have an aurora alert app on your phone, make sure it’s turned on tomorrow night. Lastly, be aware that you are totally at the mercy of the weather, and where you live will dictate what you see: if you live in the north of Scotland the aurora will have to be very bright for it to cut through your bright night sky, but people further south might, ironically, have better luck.

That’s it really. All we can do is cross our fingers and hope for the best! If you do see something be sure to let us know and send in any photos you manage to take.

Good luck!

 

  • UPDATE SUNDAY MORNING

Fingers crossed for some UK auroral activity tonight. Great weather forecast for Cumbria (some mistake surely????), and the stats are looking good, so now it’s just a case of impatiently waiting for darkness to come and getting out there to see if anything is going on. Absolutely no guarantee we’ll see anything, of course, but it’s worth a look.

Many people will go out tonight expecting – if not demanding, after all the hype – what I call a “Joanna Lumley Class” display, with a sky ablaze with green curtains, flapping and swooshing like a ship’s sails in a storm, with cherry red beams shooting up into the sky like WW2 searchlights. They’re (probably) in for a big disappointment. It’s mid-July, it never gets truly dark this time of year, so if we get some pale grey-green beams and a green “rainbow” arc I’ll be happy. Anything better than that will be a bonus, we’ll get what we’re given.

If you are planning on heading out, make sure in advance your camera batteries are charged, you have lots of room on your memory card, and your lenses are all clean; you don’t want to run out of power, or storage space, or find your photos spotted with dust circles when you look at them tomorrow. And be prepared for a long night – don’t expect the sky to “kick off” according to *your* timetable re sleep and work etc, any activity might be delayed into the early hours or until it’s daylight here in the UK again. But don’t over-think it. Just get out there, if you can, and see if anything is going on.

** And again, there’s no guarantee we’ll see anything, all I’m saying is it’s worth a look, ok? ** Good luck, all!

 

*   UPDATE SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Well, the first wave of solar material hit us earlier today (earlier than expected) and it triggered very dramatic aurora above Canada. All we can do now is cross our fingers and hope that there’s something to see later this evening, when it gets what we laughingly call “dark” at this time of the year. Remember, no-one is predicting we definitely will see the northern lights. All we’re doing is giving people a heads-up that it’s worth looking for them, just in case everything works out.

Good luck!

JUNO images the Great Red Spot…

If you felt a disturbance in the Force on Wednesday night it’s because the first images JUNO took of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot were released at teatime on that day, a couple of days earlier than expected, and both the astronomy media and the world’s “image processors” went into a feeding frenzy. (I couldn’t because I was stuck at work, but I was able to sneak a look at the images on my phone during my break). The original images are very pretty but quite muted and low contrast, so since they have been released the processors have been working hard to bring out detail, boost contrast and enhance the features around and within the Spot, using a variety of image processing techniques. Some of the results are eye-wateringly dramatic, psychedelic explosions of vivid colour. Others less so. None are “right”, none are “wrong”, they’re all just someone’s personal take on what the images inspired in them.

But the main thing is that NASA, and the JUNO team, actively encouraged members of the public to take their images and basically mess about with them, and have fun with them! I love it when people take the time to work on images like this, it means they’re engaging with a mission, investing a little bit of themselves in it, and “spreading the word” about it too. This is what I do with my Mars rover images, and it’s brilliant to see so many people having fun with the JUNO images. It proves, I think, that space exploration can be inspiring to everyone, not just tech types and science experts. And the joy that has greeted the release of these images is even more welcome because JUNO was almost sent to Jupiter *without* a camera, because its main reason for going there was to take measurements and do observations which showed their results as squiggly lines on graphs and charts – fascinating and exciting to the people involved in that, and as worthy as any image, but not very inspiring for the public. Like it or not, “pretty pictures” from space are what people see and enjoy, and the equation is quite simple: pretty pictures + public support = political funding.

So, a little late to the party, I know, and with most of the buffet already eaten, here are my processed versions of the images. Others’ are much, much better; I don’t care. I had fun making these. They’re not meant to be scientifically accurate or “useful”. They’re just shamelessly pretty pictures. And sometimes that’s enough.

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Some people get very sniffy about this kind of thing. They moan and twine that the colours “aren’t real” or “accurate”, as if to say that amateurs shouldn’t bother – or be allowed – to take the images probes sent back and work with them. I wish they wouldn’t be like that. Most aren’t, it has to be said; the VAST majority of people involved on these missions are very encouraging and supportive of the efforts of amateur image processors like myself. But a few are not so keen, and seem to enjoy being critical and a little bit mean. And that’s a shame.

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I also wrote a new “astropoem” about this event, which you can read here… click on it to enlarge it…

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